Comet C/2011 KP36 (Spacewatch)
False color image of comet C/2011 KP36 (Spacewatch), obtained on 2016 Jun. 29 (1h13-1h32UT) with 60-cm, f/3.3 Deltagraph. Exposure time 5x120s. Copyright © 2016 by H. Mikuz, Crni Vrh Observatory.

Welcome to COBS!

Comet Observation database (COBS) was developed in 2010 and is maintained by Crni Vrh Observatory. It is a unique service offering comet observers to submit, display and analyse comet data in a single location and is opened to comet observers worldwide. Registered observers may submit the observations using a simple web-based form which will store their observations into an SQL database and display them in ICQ format.

Data stored in COBS database is freely available to everyone with respect to our data usage policy, and can be analysed with COBS online tools or exported and further used in other analysis software and publications.

Database currently contains more than 225000 comet observations of more than 1100 different comets and represents the largest available database of comet observations.

Amateur comet observers can make a useful contribution to science by observing comets and submitting their observations to the COBS, as the professional astronomers do not have the time nor the telescopes needed to gather such data. We encourage comet observers worldwide to submit their observations and contribute to the COBS database.

Light-curve of Comet 237P/LINEAR (Sep 23, 2016).

Recent observations

Type  Comet name  Obs date       Mag     Dia   DC  Tail     Observer
  C      2011KP36 2016 09 30.27  13.6     0.8               RAMaa
  C      2014A4   2016 09 30.24  16.7   < 0.2               RAMaa
  V      2011KP36 2016 09 28.44  13.7:    0.6  3            WYA  
  C      2016N4   2016 09 28.43  15.2     0.5               RAMaa
  V    53         2016 09 28.43  14.0     1    3            WYA  
  V   237         2016 09 28.42  12.7     0.8  6            WYA  
  V      2016A8   2016 09 28.41  13.8     0.6  3            WYA  
  V    29         2016 09 28.39 [14.1                       WYA  
  C     9         2016 09 28.38  13.6:    0.9               RAMaa
  V      2013X1   2016 09 28.38  13.3     0.7  2            WYA  
  V   144         2016 09 28.16  11.3     0.9  3            HAS02
  C      2011KP36 2016 09 28.00  13.6     0.9               RAMaa
  V      2016A8   2016 09 27.78  12.6     0.8  3/           MEY  
  V   144         2016 09 27.76  12.0:    1.1  3            WYA  
  V    43         2016 09 27.75  12.1     1.1  3/           WYA  

                            

Comet Observing Planner

Start session:
Session length:
Limiting mag:
Min altitude:

Current comet magnitudes

Comet                     Magnitude   Trend    Observable     When visible
Comet	                  Magnitude   Trend    Observable     When visible
144P/Kushida                   9.5    fade     40 N to  5 S   early morning
81P/Wild                      10.5    fade     Poor elongation
43P/Wolf-Harrington           10.5    fade     45 N to 20 S   early morning
PanSTARRS (2013 X1)           11      fade     20 N to 85 S   evening
237P/LINEAR                   11.5    bright   15 N to 60 S   evening
9P/Tempel                     11.5    fade     30 N to 80 S   evening
PanSTARRS (2014 S2)           12      fade     Poor elongation
LINEAR (2016 A8)              12      fade     65 N to 30 S   all night
Johnson (2015 V2)             12.5    bright   70 N to 45 N   early morning
Spacewatch (2011 KP36)        13      steady   60 N to 60 S   best morning
29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann      13 ?    varies   40 N to 85 S   best evening
Catalina (2013 US10)         [13.5    fade     65 N to  5 N   morning
Lovejoy (2014 Q2)             13.5 ?  fade     60 N to 35 S   evening
53P/Van Biesbroeck            14      fade     40 N to 70 S   best evening
PanSTARRS (2014 W2)           14      fade     55 N to 20 S   early evening
226P/Pigott-LINEAR-Kowalski  [14 ?    bright   60 N to 60 S   morning

List of comets maintained by Jonathan Shanklin at http://www.ast.cam.ac.uk/~jds.


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